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Pros

A lot of nice people who are very professional. Commitment to quality. Benefits and compensation are good.

Cons

As company has gotten leave, employee became less important. Cannot trust what management says. Lack of investment in people and sites outside Switzerland. CEO more interested in his reputation and post than doing the right thing for the company.

Siegfried Response

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Helpful (4)

Work/Life Balance
Culture Values
Career Opportunities
Senior Management
Former Employee - Microbiologist in Irvine, CA
Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
No opinion of CEO

I worked at Siegfried full-time(More than a year)

Pros

- Your coworkers are generally quite nice and people tend to get along- Due to disorganization, there is not a lot of pressing work that has to be done

Cons

I wanted to write this review to express my experience of working for over a year at Siegfried. Take note, this is from a Microbiologist's Point of View, so this might be different when it comes to Chemistry, Management, or Production.- The over-arching theme of Siegfried and a reason why I think it fails is because they lack a truly dedicated LIMS system (an interconnected computer database). This means that everything is written and recorded in paper and this causes massive issues as I explore the problems with the company.- I was recruited as a microbiologist, as I had a 4 year degree and a couple of publications under my belt. I assumed, as a "Microbiologist I", I would be carrying out experiments and testing samples. Sadly, while I did this - I also had a whole host of responsibilities that were not necessarily fleshed out in the interview or job description. I was told that glassware was "to be cleaned sometimes to help out the lab." In fact, glassware was from the chemistry department, not ours, and we were somehow responsible for spending hours washing dishes that we did not use.- You will be asked to participate in Environmental Management. This includes sampling air, water (come in at 4am), plating rooms, and plating production. While generally at other companies this is reserved for lab support, or lab assistants, people with degrees were taking time out of their busy schedule running experiments to wash dishes along with scribe production for hours on end. Not to mention the fact that production were uncomfortable working in a hot room all day and would relentlessly scream over the PA system and yell at you when you walked in after you sprinted down to the production area to gown up and proceed to plate.- On top of the fact that you are responsible for EM/dishes/media preparation (something that should be done by lab support, not a microbiologist), you also are responsible for various tests that will be products produced from the plant. This is expected, as you are a microbiologist, but an issue with this is that these are sprung on the lab manager quite quickly, meaning that protocols can be wrong, instruct the scientist to devote time to a test that has not been shown to work. While this is fine for a chemist who can easily run the test again with new parameters, bacteria takes time to grow - and a microbiologist cannot do anything about that. If your protocol is wrong, you will be behind an entire week and run over your promise date. These promise dates are also assigned by non-biologists, meaning most don't have any idea how long it will take you to perform an experiment which will eventually affect your "on-time performance", which suffers from others being incompetent.- Finally, it's incredibly common to hear officeworkers cussing and yelling at each other in front of their managers and everyone else in the building. Extremely unprofessional. Show More

Advice to Management

- Acquire and build a LIMS system. A person should be able to weigh out product, and participate in experiments without recording every single thing they were doing. If a small portion of the "billions of dollars Siegfried is making" were to go towards forward-technological equipment, the experiments could be carried out much more quickly, earning the company more profit.- Crack down on yelling and insane behavior in the workplace. While people should be free to express themselves, yelling at each other should be forbidden.- Assign responsibilities intelligently. A lab tech should not be doing experiments for Microbiologists, and Microbiologists should not be doing the job of Lab Support. People are so strung out on responsibilities that simple errors and problems occur.- Raise wages. Having a lower wage is fine when the company is better. Soon enough, people will look at their responsibilities and figure out that their assignments are not worth the pay. There is nothing keeping people here. If you were to improve quality of the workplace - you would retain employees which would lead to people not getting behind because 30 other people have quit in the past year.Invest in your employees. Don't push them around. Have them do what they went to school for or trained to do. Show More

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Dylann Roof Death Penalty Trial Poses Challenging Second Phase Of Jury Selection

National

Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday

Alexandra Olgin

Dylann Roof, the 22-year-old white man accused of killing nine black people at a Charleston, S.C. church, goes back to court on Monday.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Dylann Roof heads back to court tomorrow. Roof is the white man accused of killing nine black parishioners at a historic church in Charleston, S.C. Roof will be in court for the second phase of jury selection. If convicted, prosecutors plan to seek a rare death penalty. South Carolina Public Radio's Alexandra Olgin reports.

ALEXANDRA OLGIN, BYLINE: Prosecutors say Dylann Roof is a self-avowed white supremacist who hoped the killings would start a race war. On the night of June 17, 2015, church surveillance showed the then-21-year-old entering Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Roof was wearing a gray long-sleeved shirt and dark pants when he joined the Bible study, where people were reading the Gospel of Mark, Chapter 4. After an hour, he took a pistol out of his fanny pack and fired about 80 times at the black parishioners.

One of the nine people killed that night was 70-year-old Ethel Lance, Sharon Risher's mother.

(SOUNDBITE OF WALLET UNZIPPING)

OLGIN: Risher zips open a wallet and removes a folded $5 bill.

SHARON RISHER: Those bills was on her person. And it - I don't know. It's just me maybe. There is some false something I've got in my brains about this, but it brings me comfort.

OLGIN: She is a reverend and was a trauma chaplain at a Dallas hospital for years. Since losing her mother, two cousins and a childhood friend in the shootings, she's turned to God now more than ever before.

RISHER: I have prayed more than I have ever prayed in my life.

OLGIN: Risher does not believe in the death penalty. And a recent Pew Research poll indicates the country is split on the issue. Support is even lower among black people. Less than a third believe it should be imposed when a person is convicted of murder. Robert Dunham is with the Death Penalty Information Center, an organization that tracks and studies capital cases.

ROBERT DUNHAM: You will be excluded from the jury if you say that you have views against death penalty such that you can't impose it. That disproportionately excludes jurors of color. And in a case like this, it would be extremely important to have the views of the entire African-American community represented in that jury room.

OLGIN: Dunham, whose organization is affiliated with one of the defense attorneys, says studies show a person is most likely to get the death penalty when the victims are white and the defendants are black. After the shooting, pictures surfaced of Roof posing with Confederate flags. About a month later, that led the state of South Carolina to remove its Confederate battle flag from the statehouse grounds.

The flag came down on Sharon Risher's 58th birthday. She says it meant a lot that a symbol of slavery was finally removed after decades of trying. Risher plans to sit behind Roof in court for most of the trial.

RISHER: He's going to feel, sitting in that court, what all of us want him to feel - want you to know that you caused more. You thought you was getting ready to cause a race war? Well, guess what. Backfired. Backfired.

OLGIN: Regardless of the outcome of the federal case, Roof will be tried again for the church shootings in South Carolina court a few weeks later. State prosecutors are also seeking the death penalty.

For NPR News, I'm Alexandra Olgin in Charleston.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc. , an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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